Zachary Carrettin named resident music director at Boulder Bach Festival

by Brad Turner
Colorado Public Radio, 6/2/2014


Violinist and conductor Zachary Carrettin is the new resident music director of the Boulder Bach Festival, the organization announced Monday.


Carrettin first served as concertmaster and soloist for the festival in 2011 and took over the role of music director last season.


His first concerts as music director drew raves from Boulder's Daily Camera in February:


"As music director, Carrettin ... has already established his own aesthetic and artistic standards. His first festival week as director has been a sensational triumph."


He’ll start as resident music director July 1.


Read full article

 

Bach Festival gives Carrettin new title, contract

Daily Camera, 5/31/14


Zachary Carrettin made an immediate impact on the Boulder Boulder Bach Festival when he brought his baroque violin technique to the organization in 2011.


And Carrettin was so impressive in his first year as music director that he has been given a new title, resident music director, and a three-year contract, the festival's board of directors announced Saturday.


Carrettin, 41, recently finished his first term replacing Rick Erickson, who unexpectedly resigned as music director last summer.


Carrettin's contract starts July 1. As part of his new deal, Carrettin will resign as director of orchestras at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.


Making his home in Colorado apparently was an easy decision for Carrettin.


Read full article

Read press release

 

In Focus, an interview with 3rd Law Dance/Theater

Check out this In Focus piece aired on Channel 6 RMPBS, an interview with 3rd Law Dance/Theater about their work, Boulder Arts Week and Obstinate Pearl, a collaborative event with the Boulder Bach Festival. Tickets for the Mar. 28 & 29 performances are on sale now at the Dairy
 

http://blip.tv/infocustv/in-focus-with-eden-lane-624-3rd-law-dance-theater-6757207

Press Release: Osbstinate Pearl at the Dairy Center, March 28 and 29


Boulder Bach Festival, 3rd Law Dance/Theater, and The Dairy Center for the Arts collaborate to kick off Boulder Arts Week, March 28 through April 6, 2014


Boulder Bach music director and electric violinist Zachary Carrettin joins the dance artists of 3rd Law Dance/Theater, guided by artistic co-directors Katie Elliott and Jim LaVita, in a creative and original performance of Obstinate Pearl, a visible intersection of composition and improvisation, on March 28 and March 29, at 7 p.m., at the Dairy Center for the Arts, Boulder.

This performance, presented by The Dairy Center for the Arts, marks the kick off to the inaugural Boulder Arts Week, March 28 through April 6, a city-wide celebration of Boulder's vibrant artistic and cultural offerings, including film, music, theatre, dance, the visual arts, public art, and performance.

Driven by the transcendent music of J.S. Bach, Obstinate Pearl is rife with dramatic moments created by the duel of sound and movement, as dancers and musician move through time, drawing the audience forward from the seventeenth century into the modern era with musical selections including the Biber Passacaglia from the Mystery Sonatas, Bach’s Cello Suites and Chaconne for violin, and two original works by Carrettin. This intimate collaboration pulls focus towards the center space of the stage where the relationship created between Carrettin and the dancers is spotlighted and the audience participates as witness rather than spectator.

The Baroque sensibility often evokes a sense of drama, movement, and tension. Here, the tension resonates in the sensual playing of Carrettin juxtaposed with the motivic and fluid choreography of 3rd Law and their guests.

As a style, Baroque is defined by the use of complex forms, bold ornamentation, and the juxtaposition of contrasting elements. Baroque can also refer to a “rough, elaborate or imperfect pearl.” Adding “obstinate” to the title emphasizes the rebellious qualities involved in bringing classical forms into contemporary realms and improvising against the structure set by a strong musical bass line, which is a characteristic of baroque music.

Some Baroque pearls emerge from salt water and some from fresh, but the guiding metaphor is an “obstinate” pearl emerging from a brackish habitat in the middle, where something different grows—and is seen as perfect, exactly because of its beautiful imperfections.

The space in between notes and the breath of a measure become flexible, determined by the live, in-the-moment, unspoken dialogue created each evening between Carrettin and the dancers. Just as the music is composed, the dance is choreographed, but inside that architecture is the inhalation and exhalation of live performance.

Obstinate Pearl
March 28 & 29, 2014, 7 p.m.
The Dairy Center for the Arts, 2590 Walnut Street, Boulder
$25 adults, $20 seniors/students: Pre-purchase discount $5 off until March 22, 2014.

Tickets:
The Dairy Box Office, M-F, noon–5 p.m., 303-444-7328, or online at www.thedairy.org.

Review: Boulder Bach Fest’s Deep Exploration

by Ruth Carver
for Examiner.com, 2/27/14


Boulder Bach Festival (now in its impressive 33rd season) presents a wide array of offerings throughout the year, but this past weekend gave audiences a chance to hear some rarely performed early works by the master.


J.S. Bach (1685-1750) moved around a great deal in his early 20s, seeking a profitable and musically rewarding position in several small towns in Germany. On February 21, the festival presented "From the Depths I Call To You," a program of cantatas from these formative and itinerant years...Conductor and violinist Zachary Carrettin alternately played and led the ensemble in these lively works with panache and enthusiasm that was contagious.
 

Read full article

 

Review: Zachary Carrettin a triumph with Boulder Bach Festival

By Kelly Dean Hansen
For the Daily Camera, 2/23/14
 

"As music director, Carrettin...has already established his own aesthetic and artistic standards. His first festival week as director has been a sensational triumph."

"...Listeners were treated to three of Bach's highly individual and daring early cantatas, written years before he established a sort of standard in his later Leipzig time. The festival chorus, prepared by Gregg Cannady, sang crisply and precisely, and with impeccable German diction, in two of the cantatas. But it was in the fourth vocal work, the later motet 'Komm, Jesu, komm,' where the chorus was at its best..."

 

Read full article
 

Beyond Bach: Boulder Bach Festival looks beyond its namesake

Boulder Weekly, 2/13/14

The Boulder Bach Festival is branching out.


This year´s festival weeks opens with a concert of instrumental concertos by Antonio Vivaldi (Feb. 18 in Boulder and Feb. 22 in Longmont); and a second concert, featuring Johann Sebastian Bach choral music (Feb. 22 in Denver and Feb. 23 in Boulder), opens with an oboe concerto by Alessandro Marcello (festival programs at http://www.boulderbachfestival.org).


If that seems surprising for a Bach festival, you may have missed just just how much the festival has grown in the past few years.


Read full article
 

Single tickets for Boulder Bach Festival’s 2014 concerts are now on sale!

Buy Tickets

View our 2014 events

Ticket Pricing

Adult:  $30
Group of 8 or more: $25 per ticket
(For more information on bringing a group at a discount, call 303-499-9646.)
Student: $10
Child: $5 with a paid adult ticket

Buy tickets online now!

By Phone
Call Brown Paper Tickets' 24/7 Hotline, 1-800-838-3006

 

3-Concert Packages On Sale Now - Save 17% THREE CONCERTS FOR $75!
Three-concert packages can be purchased at the door at the concerts on Feb. 18 in Boulder and Feb. 21 in Denver.

SAVE 17% OFF SINGLE TICKET PRICES!
3-concert package: 2 concerts of your choice in Feb. 2014, plus the May 2 Artist Recital in Boulder

BENEFITS
• 17% off of single ticket prices
• Up to four additional tickets at $25 per ticket
• Access to preferred seating at the Feb. 18, Feb. 23 and May 2 concerts - seating pass is ordered online and will be available at will call
• Invitation to Boulder Bach Festival artist receptions and other exclusive BBF events

Buy 3-concert packages online now!

A Message from Zachary Carrettin, Music Director


I am honored to serve as Music Director of the Boulder Bach Festival and to join the distinguished list of former music directors who, each a compelling artist, have represented many distinct manners in which to consider Bach and his music.

Recently we have been presenting works by Bach’s contemporaries, works by the young Bach, concertos by Vivaldi and Handel, chamber music with harpsichord and chamber music with grand piano. We can certainly push this envelope much further with the inclusion of satellite events and concerts performed on acoustic and electric instruments, in a variety of styles.

While diversity in music presentation certainly offers a delightfully varied festival, there is a vision which has been at the core of the Boulder Bach Festival, and I wholeheartedly share in this. Our instrumental and vocal artists seek to engage in a detailed dialogue surrounding the repertory we perform. The primary goal is to provide our audience with a transforming concert experience, one which permits them to hear the voice of Bach and what it is he had to say.

Read Zachary's bio

Boulder Bach Festival: New take on a classical composer (Boulder Weekly, 9/19/13)


New director Carrettin aims for diverse offerings
By Peter Alexander

 
Zachary Carrettin is not a strictly-by-the-book kind of guy. The new director of Boulder Bach Festival prefers to sample it all.


“As a festival that honors Bach, we need to look at his uncles, his cousins, his sons, we need to look at his Italian influences, his French influences, his organ teachers, other organists from Germany and other parts of Europe, Flemish and Dutch,” he says. Hardly pausing for breath, he forges ahead, “also Venetian composers. And I think that vision can expand into Brahms looking backward to Bach, Mendelssohn looking backward to Bach … maybe some day we’ll be talking about Bartók!"


“I believe that a festival that honors Bach is really honoring the entire tradition that came before and came after. If you ask me, the Boulder Bach Festival is a perfect platform for presenting Portuguese fado music as well as north German organ music.”


Read full article

Boulder Bach Festival Celebrates 33rd Season & Welcomes New Music Director (press release, 9/16/13)


The Boulder Bach Festival’s 2013-2014 season, which runs from September 2013 through June 2014, showcases Bach and other baroque composers with concerts, recitals, and educational events.

“Bach’s influence on Western music and other composers, conductors, vocalists, and instrumentalists has been and continues to be enormous,” said Zachary Carrettin, the Boulder Bach Festival’s new music director. “Our season reflects this vast influence by exploring Bach and his contemporaries through their music and by examining some of their baroque performance practices through our educational offerings.

Carrettin was appointed music director in July 2013, having served as concertmaster and soloist of the Boulder Bach Festival for the past two seasons. In addition to his work in Boulder,
Carrettin maintains a busy schedule with conducting, teaching, and performing while serving as the director of orchestras at Sam Houston State University.

The Boulder Bach Festival’s 2013-2014 season opens with chamber concerts on September 20 (Boulder) and September 21 (Longmont) featuring selections of Bach and Telemann. “Our fall chamber concerts provide a tiny glimpse into these composers’ worlds through the music of preludes and trio sonatas,” said Carrettin. “Intimate in feel and venue, I encourage everyone to come and be fed, intellectually, emotionally, artistically, and spiritually.”

An all-Vivaldi concerto concert on February 18, 2014, (Boulder) opens the traditional Bach festival week. “Vivaldi’s concertos are the epitome of the Venetian baroque voice, influenced by the numerous cultures of those from far away who passed through the port of Venice,” said Carrettin. “The music is at once exotic and yet quintessentially Italian. We will present these works performed on violin, bassoon, viola d’amore, and flute, offering our audiences the opportunity to hear the voice of Vivaldi in direct collaboration with each of our soloists.” The concert repeats on February 22, 2014, in Longmont.

The festival weeks continues with concerts on February 21 (Denver) and February 23 (Boulder) featuring concertos, cantatas, and motets. “These concerts begin with the famous Marcello oboe concerto, featuring the florid ornaments Bach composed to be added to Marcello’s published material,” said Carrettin. “Bach is considered one of the greatest improvisers in the history of music, and his ornamental writing here is free and full of nuance. What he has done with this concerto is simply gorgeous.”

The program for the festival concerts, with a full complement of instrumentalists, chorus, and soloists, includes “Komm, Jesu Komm,” which Carrettin considers to be a “work of mind boggling depth and complexity,” and three cantatas—BMV 131, 150, and 196—all of which he describes as “dramatic and rich, and colorful and diverse.”

The spring artist recital on May 2, 2014, in Boulder, will be an intimate evening of partitas and dance suites, featuring violinist and CU music professor Lina Bahn, pianist and CU professor David Korevaar, and Zachary Carrettin.

In addition to programming concerts and recitals, the Boulder Bach Festival maintains an ever-present focus on education, with its popular and enriching events for young musicians. Bach For Kids, November 16, 2013, features the Boulder Bach Trio at the WOW! Children’s Museum in Lafayette, which is open to children and adults alike. Kids For Bach, February 9, 2014, presents selected young talent performing works of Bach; and Bach For Kids, May 11, 2014, features the Boulder Bach Trio and Boulder Suzuki Strings. These two events are sponsored by the Boulder Library Foundation and are held at the main branch of the Boulder Public Library, in the Canyon Theater.

Bach Camp!, a weeklong educational event for string players of all ages, returns for its second year, from June 9 through June 13, 2014. This year the focus will be on studying and performing baroque chamber orchestra literature, using baroque bows.

“Our classes and workshops provide the perfect opportunity to have multifaceted conversations about music, the self, and society,” said Carrettin. “The conversations influence the way we play and the way we communicate with the world around us.”

Dates & Details for 2013-2014 Boulder Bach Festival Concerts and Events (33rd Season)

FALL CHAMBER CONCERTS
Bach vs. Telemann:  Preludes and Trio Sonatas
FRIDAY, SEP. 20, 2013 – 7:30 PM
St. John’s Episcopal Church
1419 Pine St., Boulder

SATURDAY, SEP. 21, 2013 – 7:30 PM
First Lutheran Church
Third Ave. & Terry St., Longmont

Prelude I: Bach Bourrée 1 from the C Major Suite for cello, BWV 1009, viola d’amore
Telemann Trio Sonata in D Major for flute, viola d'amore and continuo, TWV 42:D15 
Prelude II: Bach Praeludium in C Minor, BWV 921, harpsichord
Bach Musicalisches Opfer, Sonata sopr'il Soggetto Reale a Traversa, Violino e Continuo, BWV 1079
Prelude III: Telemann Fantasia No. 7 in D Major, TWV 40, bassoon
Telemann Trio Sonata in B flat Major for violin, bassoon and continuo, TWV: 42:B5 
Prelude IV: Fantasia No. 11 in G Major, TWV: 40, flute
Bach Trio Sonata in G Major, BWV 1039

Bach for Kids Concert (Bach in Community) 
SATURDAY, NOV. 16, 2013 – 11:00 AM
WOW! Children’s Museum
110 N. Harrison Avenue, Lafayette – no charge
Boulder Bach Trio

Kids for Bach Concert (Bach in Community)
SUNDAY, FEB. 9, 2014 – 2:00 PM
Boulder Public Library Canyon Theatre
1001 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder – no charge
K-12 auditioned winners will perform solo and chamber works of J.S. Bach

Vivaldi Concerti Concert
TUESDAY, FEB. 18, 2014 – 7:30 PM
Mountain View Methodist Church
355 Ponca Place, Boulder

SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 2104 – 7:30 PM
First Lutheran Church
Third Ave. & Terry St., Longmont

Vivaldi Sinfonia for Strings “Al Santo Sepolcro” in B minor, RV169
Vivaldi Concerto for Flute “La Notte” in G minor, RV 439
Vivaldi Concerto for Violin in A minor, RV 356
Vivaldi Concerto for Viola d’amore in D minor, RV 394
Vivaldi Concerto for Bassoon in E minor, RV 484
Vivaldi Concerto for Four Violins in B minor, RV 580

FESTIVAL WEEK 2014
Concerto, Cantatas, Motet Concert
FRIDAY, FEB. 21, 2014 – 7:30 PM
St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral
1350 Washington Street, Denver

SUNDAY, FEB. 23, 2104 – 4:00 PM
Mountain View Methodist Church
355 Ponca Place, Boulder

Marcello Concerto for Oboe in D minor
Bach Cantata Der Herr denket an uns, BWV 196
Bach Motet No. 3 Komm Jesu Komm, BWV 229
Bach Cantata Nach dir Herr, BWV 150
Bach Cantata Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir, BWV 131

Spring Artists Recital
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2104 – 7:30 PM
First Congregational Church
1128 Pine Street, Boulder
Featured Artists:  Lina Bahn, violin; Zachary Carrettin, viola; David Korevaar, piano

Bach Partita No. 3 in E Major BWV 1006
Bach Partita No.4 in D Major, BWV 828
Bach Suite No. 2 in D Minor for Violoncello Solo, BWV 1008 (transcribed for the viola by Carrettin)
Bach Sonata for Violin and Keyboard No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1016

Bach for Kids Concert (Bach in Community)
SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 – 2:00 PM
Boulder Public Library Canyon Theatre
1001 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder – no charge
Boulder Bach Trio and Boulder Suzuki Strings

Bach Camp!
Baroque Performance Practice Program

MONDAY, JUNE 9 - FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2014
Trinity Lutheran Church,
2200 Broadway, Boulder
A week-long educational event for string players of all ages.


About the Boulder Bach Festival
The Boulder Bach Festival was founded in 1981 to present the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and to encourage knowledge and appreciation of the Baroque master. Since 1982 a multi-day festival has been presented each year, featuring an orchestra, chorus, and soloists drawn from a pool of area musicians as well as nationally-known artists from around the country. Over the years it has gradually added concerts outside of its original format so that presentations now extend through most of the year. For programming, tickets, and further information, visit the website at http://www.boulderbachfestival.org or call 303-776-9666.  

###

Zachary Carrettin on KGNU’s A Classic Monday - 9/10/13


Our new Music Director Zachary Carrettin was featured on KGNU's A Classic Monday program with Ron Nadel on Monday, September 9. If you missed it, you can listen to the full interview here:

http://www.kgnu.org/classical/9/9/2013

Boulder Bach Festival music director seeks to add stability, variety

By Kelly Dean Hansen
Camera Classical Music Writer


Since the departure of longtime Boulder Bach Festival music director Robert Spillman, none of his successors has remained in the post for very long, and there was a brief period when the organization functioned without a full-time occupant of the position.


Newly appointed director Zachary Carrettin, who was immediately offered the post after Rick Erickson's departure earlier this year, told the Camera he anticipates a long tenure and is fully committed to the position. Read full article...

 

Boulder Bach Festival Appoints Zachary Carrettin as New Music Director

Boulder Bach Festival Appoints Zachary Carrettin as New Music Director

BOULDER, Colo., June 2, 2013 – The Boulder Bach Festival Board of Directors has appointed Zachary Carrettin, noted violinist and conductor, as the new music director, effective July 1, 2013. Carrettin has served as concertmaster and soloist of the Boulder Bach Festival since 2011 and is co-directing the festival’s inaugural baroque performance practice summer program from June 10 to June 14, 2013.

 

“Zachary Carrettin’s artistry and extensive knowledge of baroque style and Bach’s music have delighted festival audiences and the community for the past two seasons,” said Dan Seger, president, Boulder Bach Festival Board of Directors. “We look forward to the most exhilarating performances of Bach’s music, together with dynamic educational experiences for our community under Zachary’s leadership.”

As concertmaster of the Boulder Bach Festival, Carrettin has led dynamic instrumental performances in collaboration with leading baroque instrument soloists while nurturing the development of local professionals interested in learning eighteenth-century stylistic approaches. Carrettin most recently taught a master class for baroque violinists at the University of Colorado Boulder. Currently, Carrettin balances symphonic and choral conducting, teaching, and solo performing while serving as Director of Orchestras at Sam Houston State University and Principal Conductor of the Cypress Symphony in Texas.

He has performed as conductor, soloist, and concertmaster with America’s finest baroque orchestras, including the American Bach Soloists in San Francisco, Musica Angelica in Los Angeles, Camerata Pacifica in Santa Barbara, Houston’s Ars Lyrica, and the Holy Trinity Bach Orchestra in New York.  He toured and recorded baroque choral repertory with the world-renowned choir Chanticleer and held the post of Music Director at St. Peter’s United Church of Christ in Champaign, Illinois.

Zachary Carrettin replaces the Rick Erickson, who led the Boulder Bach Festival for the past two years and was instrumental in its rejuvenation. Erickson is moving on from this leadership position to attend to his growing commitments in New York City, throughout the U.S., and abroad.

“Rick Erickson has strengthened the reputation of the festival both locally and nationally with his exquisite musical performances, understanding of baroque performance practice, and his extensive knowledge of the man—J. S. Bach,” said Seger.

About the Boulder Bach Festival
The Boulder Bach Festival, founded in 1981, celebrates the music of Johann Sebastian Bach by providing high quality performances and educational opportunities that not only satisfy those who already love Bach’s music, but also introduce Bach’s music to others. It is the premier festival in the Rocky Mountain Region dedicated to the propagation of the legacy of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Zachary Carrettin's full bio

###

Review: Boulder Bach Festival: St. John Passion overflows with emotion

Daily Camera, 3/2/13
By Kelly Dean Hansen


...Friday at St. John's Cathedral in Denver, the two-hour work was given one of the most heartfelt, intense, and yes, passionate performances the Bach Festival has seen in several years. The Passion will be presented again tonight in Boulder at Mountain View Methodist Church.


Erickson led the choir and instrumental ensemble with focus and concentration, bringing out every emotional nuance in the text and the music. The story of Jesus' trial and death, in the vivid language of John's gospel, could not have been more immediately present...Read full review

Review: The Boulder Bach Festival’s St. John Passion: Intricate and Massive and Wonderful

OpusColorado.com, 3/2/13
By Robin McNeil


...This was a remarkable performance of a remarkable piece, and I could not help but wonder at the impact this piece must have had at its first performance. It is achingly descriptive, and in spite of the portions in major keys, there is no question that it is one of the most solemn and intense works by Bach. This was certainly reflected in this stunning performance, and there were several moments when I witnessed those sitting near me lightly touching their eyes. All of the great composers affect us in different ways, and all of us have heard performances that we will remember for a lifetime. Friday night, the audience received a lesson the massive strength and intricacy of this work and of J. S. Bach.


Read full review

The passions of Bach

Boulder Bach Festival focuses on composer’s religious works
Boulder Weekly, 2/28/13
By Peter Alexander


Bach’s St. John Passion is a dramatic musical work that tells the story of Jesus’ betrayal and crucifixion.


From other perspectives, it is a great work of art, a powerful religious experience and a Lutheran devotional event. And it forms the centerpiece of this year’s Boulder Bach Festival.


Read full article

Bach Festival presents dramatic work (Daily Camera, 2/22/13)

by Kelly Dean Hansen
Feb. 22, 2013


Since taking over as music director in 2011, Rick Erickson has turned the Boulder Bach Festival into a yearlong event with a continual presence. He has performed Bach liturgically. He has delved into obscure but exciting repertoire. He has given solo performances of the composer's organ works. But next weekend -- Friday in Denver and Saturday in Boulder -- Erickson finally will tackle one of the composer's full-length choral works.
 

Read full article

KGNU Interview with Boulder Bach Festival Music Director Rick Erickson

 

KGNU's Ron Nadel recently interviewed BBF Music Director Rick  Erickson, which aired on Monday, February 11 as part of A Classic Monday on KGNU 88.5 FM. The interview consisted of discussion of historically-informed performance trends and techniques interspersed with music for the first hour. Ron played other baroque music using HIP techniques during the second hour.


Listen to the interview in full:

Boulder Bach Festival’s 32nd Season – September 2012 to May 2013


Expanded season features chamber concerts, educational program for kids, and the signature work, the St. John Passion


Updated January 31, 2013


J.S. Bach spent his entire life copying, transcribing, performing, and studying works of his predecessors and contemporaries. The 32nd Boulder Bach Festival season, which runs from September 2012 to May 2013, underscores these rich, musical contexts that inspired and informed Bach’s genius and connected him to the broader world of his time. The season also reflects additional concerts, educational events, and activities as the Boulder Bach Festival expands its own context and presence on the Front Range.

“It’s such a joy to share in the music-making of Bach,” said Rick Erickson, music director of the Boulder Bach Festival, now in his second season. “And, I’m excited that this season has wonderful concerts and programs designed for understanding Bach in the musical context of his time.”

The season opens with chamber concerts on September 28, 29, and 30, 2012— in Longmont, Denver, and Boulder, respectively—that feature the Boulder Bach Festival Players and highlight the world of concerti in which Bach lived. Works by Corelli, Vivaldi, and Handel surround a core of Bach favorites.

On December 14, 2012, the Festival Chamber Choir performs at the Longmont Council for the Arts’ Friday Afternoon Concerts with a program of seasonal selections that include Bach, some traditional holiday fare, and Mexican Baroque selections.

The festival week opens on February 24, 2013, with a concert featuring the Festival Players and artists in solo roles in a program of Bach and Buxtehude, as well as some of Bach’s own organ chorale preludes on chorales later used in the great St. John Passion. On March 1 and March 2, 2013, in Denver and Boulder, respectively, the Boulder Bach Festival Chorus, soloists, and orchestra perform the signature work of the season, the St. John Passion.

“I’ve conducted this magnificent work countless times,” said Erickson. “It’s rich, it’s deep, and it’s dramatic. Every time we arrive at the final chorale, Herzlich lieb, the culmination of the entire work, I can’t help but get overwhelmed and emotional,” said Erickson. “It’s pure Bach.”

The popular and enriching educational events for kids remain an integral part of the Boulder Bach Festival. Kids For Bach, February 10, 2013, presents selected young talent performing works of Bach; Bach For Kids, May 12, 2013, presents talented adult performers in an event for kids of all ages. The Boulder Library Foundation sponsors these events, which are held at the main branch of the Boulder Public Library, in the Canyon Theater.

This year's Bach in the Community series features outstanding artists in addition to a group of musicians selected from the Kids for Bach program, all giving brief performances in coffee houses, hotel lobbies, and other venues throughout Boulder.

In June 2013, the Boulder Bach Festival takes on a new endeavor with the launch of Bach Camp!, a weeklong event for serious students from the Front Range to focus on Baroque string technique and harpsichord continuo techniques.

“This year’s Boulder Bach Festival season provides a fine variety of offerings for appreciating Bach’s genius, hearing his music, and understanding his world,” said Erickson. “I look forward to sharing it with our wonderful audiences along the Front Range.”

Dates for 2012/2013 Boulder Bach Festival Concerts and Events (32nd Season)

FALL CHAMBER CONCERTS
Concerti of J. S. Bach and His Contemporaries
Friday, September 28, 2012, 7:30 p.m.
First Lutheran Church, Third Avenue and Terry Street, Longmont
Sponsored by Snyder Jewelers
Saturday, September 29, 2012, 7:30 p.m.
St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 2015 Glenarm Place, Denver
Sunday, September 30, 2012, 4:00 p.m.
St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1419 Pine Street, Boulder
Zachary Carrettin and Nurit Pacht, violins; Ezra Seltzer, cello; Rick Erickson, harpsichord and organ
Boulder Bach Festival Players

Corelli   Concerto Grosso No. 1 in D Major, Op. 6
Vivaldi   Concerto for Violin in A minor RV 356
Bach   Concerto for Violin in A minor BWV 1041
Handel   Concerto for Organ in F Major, Op. 4, No. 4 HWV 292
Bach   Cello Suite No. 2 in D minor BWV 1008
Bach   Concerto for Two Violins in D minor BWV 1043

BACH IN THE COMMUNITY – BACH FOR KIDS CONCERT
Saturday, November 10, 2012, 11:00 a.m.
WOW Children’s Museum, 110 North Harrison Avenue, Lafayette
Boulder Bach Festival Trio
FREE

BACH IN THE COMMUNITY – FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONCERTS AND ART SHOW
Friday, December 14, 2012, 2:30 p.m.
Longmont Senior Center, 901 Longs Peak Avenue, Longmont
Sponsored by the Longmont Arts Council
Boulder Bach Festival Chamber Choir
Gregg Cannady, chorus master; Susan Olenwine, piano
TICKETS ARE $8 AT THE DOOR

BACH IN THE COMMUNITY – KIDS FOR BACH CONCERT
Sunday, February 10, 2013, 2:00 p.m.
Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder
Sponsored by the Boulder Public Library Foundation
K-12 auditioned winners will perform solo and chamber works of J. S. Bach.
FREE

OPENING FESTIVAL WEEK CONCERT
Festival Players and Artists in Solo Roles
Sunday, February 24, 2013, 4:00 P.M.
St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1419 Pine Street, Boulder
Zachary Carrettin, violin; Sarah Brailey, soprano; Paul Erhard, bass; Rick Erickson, organ

Bach   Prelude in B minor BWV 544
Buxtehude   O Clemens, o mitis, o coelestis Pater BuxWV 82
Bach   Allemande, Bourrées and Gigue from the Cello Suite No. 3 in C Major BWV 1009
Organ preludes on chorales from the St. John Passion
   Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, O Herr, BWV 1115
   Ach Herr, mich armen Sunder, BWV 742
   Valet will ich dir geben, BWV 736

Bach    Sonata for Violin No. 1 in G minor BWV 1001
Buxtehude    First Verse of the Cantata Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, o Herr BuxWV 41
Bach    Fugue in B minor BWV 544

FESTIVAL WEEK CONCERTS
St. John Passion BWV 245
Friday, March 1, 2013, 7:30 p.m.
St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1350 Washington Street, Denver
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 7:30 p.m.
Mountain View Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Place, Boulder
Boulder Bach Festival Chorus, Soloists and Players
Rick Erickson, conductor

SPRING ARTIST RECITAL
Duo Crezdi

Friday, May 3, 2013, 7:30 p.m.
First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street, Boulder
Zachary Carrettin, violin; Rick Erickson, harpsichord and organ

Castello   Sonata prima in A minor from Libro secundo
Krebs    Fugue on B-A-C-H
Boehm    Vater unser im Himmelreich
Bach    Duetto no. 3 in G Major BWV 804
Veracini    Sonata in G minor, Op. 2, No. 1
Bach    Partita on Sei gegrϋsset, Jesu gϋtig BWV 768
Biber    Passacaglia
Bach    Sonata no. 4 in C minor BWV 1017

BACH IN THE COMMUNITY – BACH FOR KIDS CONCERT
Sunday, May 12, 2013, 2:00 p.m.
Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Avenue
Sponsored by the Boulder Public Library Foundation
Boulder Bach Festival Trio
FREE

BOULDER BACH FESTIVAL BAROQUE PERFORMANCE PRACTICE TRAINING DEBUT – Bach Camp!
June 10-14, 2013
Trinity Lutheran Church, 2200 Broadway, Boulder, CO
This four-day educational event for musicians of all ages will focus on Baroque string and harpsichord techniques and include one-on-one and group lessons and presentations on relevant topics with master baroque artists Rick Erickson and Zachary Carrettin. Application details are posted on the BBF website, http://www.boulderbachfestival.org

ANNUAL BOULDER BACH FESTIVAL BENEFIT CONCERT AND RECEPTION
Zachary Carrettin, violin and Mina Gajic, piano playing Bach, Mendelssohn, and Brahms
Thursday, June 13, 2013
Performance at 6:30 PM at First Congregational Church
Reception at 7:30 PM on the Hotel Boulderado Mezzanine
 

About the Boulder Bach Festival
The Boulder Bach Festival was founded in 1981 to present the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and to encourage knowledge and appreciation of the Baroque master. Since 1982 a multi-day festival has been presented each year, featuring an orchestra, chorus, and soloists drawn from a pool of area musicians as well as nationally-known artists from around the country. Over the years it has gradually added concerts outside of its original format so that presentations now extend through most of the year. For programming, tickets, and further information, visit the website at http://www.boulderbachfestival.org or call 303-776-9666.

#  #  #

Fall Boulder Bach Festival features baroque concertos (Daily Camera)

By Kelly Dean Hansen
Daily Camera, 9/23/2012


The Boulder Bach Festival's expansion to a more year-round event outside the regular festival week has, according to music director Rick Erickson, been a tremendous success.


"We love being a more regular presence in Boulder," he said, "and enjoying our Bach at different times of the year."


Last season's fall concert was hugely successful and artistically impeccable, creating a high anticipation for the full festival week in March. And that's good reason, Erickson said, to feature different genres of music at the different concerts. During this year's festival week, there will be no music for larger instrumental ensemble without voices. That repertoire will fall to the fall concert.


"This season, because our featured work, the St. John Passion, is such a huge undertaking, we felt it best not to overtax our ensemble musicians," Erickson said. "Placing this concert in September is a good way to make sure this repertoire is covered."
 

Read full article

Boulder Bach Beat: Interview with Zachary Carrettin - “Bach, the Passionate”

Edward McCue (EM): Zachary, how are Rick Erickson and you interpreting this year’s theme, “Bach, the Passionate?”

Zachary Carrettin (ZC): As a theme, “Bach, the Passionate” manages to embrace both of the largest programs of our new season. The Chamber Concerts this month will feature Italian-influenced concertos and how Bach adapted the passionate Italian style of writing and playing, especially in the case of the violin as a virtuoso instrument. In contrast, ”Bach, the Passionate” also celebrates our Festival Week performances of his St. John Passion (BWV 245). In that great work we will hear Bach’s religious fervor telling the story of the Passion of Jesus Christ. These two very different kinds of passion will result in dramatically different listening experiences that reveal Bach at his very best...

Read full article

Boulder Bach Beat: Interview with Rick Erickson: 32nd Season Kickoff

Edward McCue (EM): Now that we’re starting a new season, how do you feel about last year’s season and its theme, “Brandenburg and More?”

Rick Erickson (RE): I loved it, and I know that other people did, too. It was so much fun to do the complete Brandenburg Concertos over the season, plus the cantatas and everything else. As an instrumental ensemble and chorus, we all got to know each other, and this season is the direct result of all the great ideas that developed as we walked through last season together.

Read full blog post

Boulder Bach Festival’s 32nd Season – September 2012 to May 2013 (OpusColorado.com)

OpusColorado.com
August 21, 2012

The press release that I received concerning this concert season’s Boulder Bach Festival stated that the season has been expanded. That is an understatement. It is huge, and aside from the remarkable works that are being performed, one of the most exciting events (the St. John Passion is also being performed) is a Bach Camp in June. It is for all ages, not just a camp for young people. This is remarkable opportunity for Bach lovers who are not necessarily extensively trained musicians to learn in detail about Bach and the period of time in which he lived.

Read full article...

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: The Suites for Violoncello

Bach’s six Suites for Unaccompanied Violoncello (BWV 1007-12) are among the most frequently performed compositions written for a solo stringed instrument. Each suite consists of six dance movements, and the entire collection appears to be a carefully conceived cycle as opposed to an arbitrary series of pieces.

Most likely composed during Bach’s Cöthen period of 1717–1723, the lack of an autographed manuscript results in uncertainty as to whether the suites were composed before or after the 1720 Sonata and Partitas for Violin (BWV 1001-6), and the vagueness of the very early use of the term “violoncello” (“small large viol”) does not suggest whether the pieces were intended to played on an instrument held da gamba (between the legs) or da spalla (on the shoulder).

Read full blog post...

 

New director completes his first Boulder Bach Festival (Daily Camera)

By Kelly Dean Hansen
Daily Camera, 3/13/12

Boulder's Bach fans have experienced Rick Erickson's vision of the master, and they like what they hear. With the completion of his first festival week, the new Boulder Bach Festival director has not only given audiences an unusually wide range of the composer's output, but placed it in its original context...

Read full article

Bach, Beautiful Bach. (Boulder Music Festivals Examiner)

by Aleta Randall
Boulder Music Festivals Examiner, 3/6/12


When I last attended a performance by Boulder Bach Festival, it was the final Chamber Music performance of the Festival’s Season. The 2011/12 Season was the Festival’s 31st, and under the guidance of newly appointed Music Director Rick Erikson’s promethean hand, what a Season it was...

Read full article

Festival Week Open Rehearsal Schedule

We invite you to drop-in for our Open Rehearsals during Festival Week:


Tuesday, Feb. 28
6:30-9:30 PM, First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St.


Thursday, Mar. 1
10 AM-1 PM, Soli with Instruments, Mountain View Methodist Church, 355 Ponca St.
6-9:30 PM, Chorus, Soli, with Instruments – Mountain View Methodist Church


Friday, Mar. 2
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1
1-4 PM, Mountain View Methodist Church
7-10 PM, Mountain View Methodist Church

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Joe Damon Chappel - Singing Bass


Edward McCue (EM): What is noteworthy about the way that Bach writes for the bass voice?


Joe Damon Chappel (JDC):  While Bach wrote most of his soprano and alto parts for young boys whose voices had not yet changed, he wrote his bass arias and recitatives for mature voices. His basses were typically young men who had been under his training for six, seven or even eight years at St. Thomas School in Leipzig, and, as a result, Bach wrote the bass parts to be as difficult as any written for other instruments.

Read the full interview

“BACH IN COMMUNITY” EVENT SCHEDULE - Feb. 27 through Mar. 2

"BACH IN COMMUNITY" EVENT SCHEDULE - Feb. 27 through Mar. 2

As part of the 2012 Festival Week, the Boulder Bach Festival is introducing intimate "Bach in the Community" events held in smaller venues around Boulder, i.e., coffee shops and cafes. These events bring Boulder Bach Festival musicians into the community and bring Bach's music to new listeners.

All Events are FREE and open to the public!

See the full event schedule

Celebrating “always honest, always profound” J.S. Bach at Boulder Bach Festival (Denver Post)


Celebrating "always honest, always profound" Johann Sebastian Bach at Boulder Bach Festival
by Sabine Kortals
Denver Post, 2/17/12


When it comes to Johann Sebastian Bach, Rick Erickson never had a choice.


"I consider myself born into Bach," said the newish music director of the Boulder Bach Festival, in his post since July...

Read full article

Passions & masses: Bach director brings cantata experience to festival week (Daily Camera)


Passions & masses: Bach director brings cantata experience to festival week
by Kelly Dean Hansen
Daily Camera, 2/19/12


The hiring of Rick Erickson as music director last year has drawn praise and signified rejuvenation for the Boulder Bach Festival. An opening "preview" concert in September was an unqualified success, setting the tone and anticipation for the main festival week, which begins Friday with a solo organ recital in Denver at St. John's Cathedral, to be repeated Saturday in Boulder at First Congregational Church.

Read full article

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Michael Unger - “Bach Inspirations”


Edward McCue (EM): What is behind the title “Bach Inspirations” that you’ve given to your concerts at St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Denver and First Congregational Church in Boulder?

Michael Unger (MU): With this program I’m inviting the audience to investigate some of the various ways in which Bach has inspired generations of musicians that came after him, how Bach himself may have been inspired by the music that he himself had heard, and also how we are all still inspired by Bach.
 

Read the full interview on the Boulder Bach Beat Blog

Bach for a lifetime (Boulder Weekly)


Rick Erickson, the new director of the Boulder Bach Fest, discusses why Bach remains so popular
by Peter Alexander
Boulder Weekly, 2/9/12

Rick Erickson’s father told him, “When you have Bach, you don’t need anything else.”  Erickson, the new director of the Boulder Bach Festival, took that advice to heart...

Read the full article

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Dan Seger - Bach in the Community

Edward McCue (EM): In addition to presenting formal concerts, how is the Boulder Bach Festival introducing people to Bach and his music?

Dan Seger (DS): Under the umbrella of ”Bach in the Community,” the Festival interacts with listeners and performers of all ages to bring Bach out of the concert hall and into their daily activities.

Read the full interview on the Boulder Bach Beat Blog

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Gregg Cannady - Singing a Motet

Edward McCue (EM): Rick Erickson has shared extensive details about the chorale tradition and Bach’s cantatas, but you’re in the midst of preparing one of Bach’s motets for performance by the Festival Chorus on 3 March 2012. Tell us about Lobet den Herrn alle Heiden (BWV 230).

Gregg Cannady (GC): For some time there was a debate about whether this motet was really by Bach, but the general consensus today is that it was an early work that might have been commissioned for a special occasion, such as a memorial service...

 

Read the full interview on the Boulder Bach Beat Blog

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Zachary Carrettin - Finding Our Sound

Edward McCue (EM): How is the Boulder Bach Festival ensemble developing its own sound?


Zachary Carrettin (ZC): Our instrumentalists come from a diversity of backgrounds, and each one of us has strong opinions and a strong musical voice. As we prepare our February and March programs, we’re working together to develop a unified voice with real character.


Read the full interview on the Boulder Bach Beat Blog

Boulder Bach Festival Celebrates “Brandenburg and More”: 31st season Continues, Feb. 24 - Mar. 4

The Boulder Bach Festival opened its 31st season in September under the direction of music director Rick Erickson with concerts in Boulder and Denver, attracting full houses and critical acclaim.  With its annual Festival Week from February 24 to March 4, 2012, the Festival continues its celebration of “Brandenburg and More,” with an organ recital, chamber concerts, choral works, and a colloquium. 

The Festival Organ Recital, February 24 & 25, 2012, in Denver and Boulder, respectively, features Michael Unger, the 2008 First Prize Winner of the American Guild of Organists National

Young Artists Competition. Unger, a Gold Medal graduate of the University of Western Ontario, received his master’s degrees in organ and harpsichord from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. He performs extensively as a soloist and is also a church musician, chamber musician, and published composer.

The Boulder Bach Festival week kicks off on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, with the third “Bach in the Community” event featuring a colloquium that probes the deeper complexities of Bach and performances by festival artists. This afternoon event, which is free and open to the public, provides a wonderful introduction to the subsequent performances during the festival week.

The festival week continues on Wednesday, February 29, 2012, with a chamber concert featuring Brandenburg Concertos No. 2 and No. 4, Bach choral selections, and Bach solo organ works performed by Rick Erickson.

On Thursday, March 1, 2012, the final “Bach in the Community” event takes place with Bach for Kids, an interactive and multidimensional event featuring Boulder Bach Festival artists and kids at the Boulder Public Library.

The Boulder Bach Festival final concert takes place on March 3, 2012, at the Mountain View United Methodist Church, in Boulder, with the Boulder Bach Festival Players and the Boulder Bach Festival Chorus, featuring Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, Cantatas BWV 147 and 187, and Motet BWV 230. Vocal soloists include Amanda Balestrieri, soprano; Eric Brenner, countertenor; Daniel Hutchings, tenor; and Joe Damon Chappel, bass.

Bach Vespers, after the New York practice based on the Leipzig tradition, is a post-festival special event that takes place on March 4, 2012, at Grace Lutheran Church, in Boulder, with featured festival artists and vocal soloists performing Cantata BWV 159, Sehet, wir gehn hinauf gen Jerusalem. The audience is invited to sing the chorale movement.     

Dates for 2012 Boulder Bach Festival Concerts and Events (31st Season)

Bach in the Community, Kids for Bach Concert, February 12, 2012, Sunday, 2 p.m.
Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. (at 9th St. and Canyon)
K through 12 auditioned winners performing solo and chamber works of J.S. Bach (free)

Festival Organ Recital
February 24, 2012, Friday, St. John’s Cathedral, 1350 Washington Street, Denver, 7:30 p.m.
February 25, 2012, Saturday, First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street, Boulder, 7:30 p.m.
Michael Unger, 2008 Winner, Guild of Organists’ National Young Artists Competition.

Festival Week, Bach in the Community, Festival Artist Demonstrations and Colloquium: February 28, 2012, Tuesday, 2 to 4 p.m.,  First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street (free)

Festival Week, Chamber Concert
Open rehearsals, First Congregational Church, Boulder
February 27, 2012, Monday, 1 to 4 p.m.
February 28, 2012, Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.   
February 28, 2012, Tuesday, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. (dress rehearsal)

Chamber Concert, February 29, 2012, Wednesday, First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street, Boulder, 7:30 p.m.
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2, BWV 1047
Cantata BWV 167, Ihr Menschen, rϋhmet Gottes Liebe, chorale
Schmϋcke dich, O liebe Seele, BWV 654, organ
Mein treuer Heiland, lass dich fragen, bass aria and chorale, from St. John Passion
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, BWV 1049

Boulder Bach Festival Artists:  Joe Damon Chappel, bass; Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello; Rick Erickson, harpsichord and organ; Christina Jennings, flute; Bruce Barrie, trumpet
Boulder Bach Festival Players and Boulder Bach Festival Chamber Choir  

Bach in the Community, Bach for Kids, Interactive Sessions with Festival Artists
March 1, 2012, Thursday, Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. (9th & Canyon), 2:30 to 5 p.m.
A multidimensional, interactive day with BBF artists and kids (free)

Festival Week Finale Concert
March 3, 2012, Saturday, Mountain View United Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Street, Boulder, 7:30 p.m.
Cantata BWV 187, Es wartet alles auf dich
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, BWV 1046
Motet BWV 230, Lobet den Herrn alle Heiden
Cantata BWV 147, Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben

Rick Erickson, conductor; BBF artists Amanda Balestrieri, soprano; Eric Brenner, countertenor; Daniel Hutchings, tenor; Joe Damon Chappel, bass; Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello
Boulder Bach Festival Players and Boulder Bach Festival Chorus
Open rehearsals, Mountain View United Methodist Church, Boulder
March 1, 2012, Thursday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 1, 2012, Thursday, 6 to 9:30 p.m.
March 2, 2012, Friday, 7 to 10 p.m. (dress rehearsal)

Bach Vespers, after the New York practice based on the Leipzig tradition
March 4, 2012, Sunday, Grace Lutheran Church, 1001 13th Street, Boulder, 4:15 p.m.

Rick Erickson, conductor; BBF artists Amanda Balestrieri, soprano; Eric Brenner, countertenor; Daniel Hutchings, tenor; Joe Damon Chappel, bass; Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello;  and Boulder Bach Festival Players
Cantata BWV 159, Sehet, wir gehn hinauf gen Jerusalem 
The audience is invited to sing the chorale movement. Audience rehearsal at 3:45 p.m.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

About the Boulder Bach Festival
The Boulder Bach Festival was founded in 1981 to present the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and to encourage knowledge and appreciation of the Baroque master. Since 1982 a multi-day festival has been presented each year, featuring an instrumental ensemble, chorus, and soloists drawn from a pool of area musicians as well as nationally-known artists from around the country. Over the years it has gradually added concerts outside of its original format so that presentations now extend through most of the year. The 31st season introduces new music director, Rick Erickson. For programming, tickets, and further information, visit the website at http://www.boulderbachfestival.org or call 303-776-9666.  

###

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Rick Erickson - Bach’s Cantatas

Edward McCue (EM):  Please tell us more about the cantatas as they have been performed less frequently here in Boulder than some of Bach’s other works.

Rick Erickson (RE):  I really wanted to begin this season of my first year with cantatas, rather than what are sometimes called “Bach’s major works.” Cantatas are the heart of Bach and employ both brilliant instrumentation and writing for voices in both ensemble and in solo roles.


Read the full interview on the Boulder Bach Beat Blog

 

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Interview with Rick Erickson - “Brandenburg and More”

Edward McCue (EM): The launch of your first season as Music Director with the Boulder Bach Festival at concerts in September was greeted with sold out concerts and very positive press. How did you happen to come up with the theme for this season, “Brandenburg and More?”


Rick Erickson (RE):  I felt that it was important to begin my tenure as Music Director by focusing on several things. One of those chief issues was to form an instrumental ensemble with its own identifiable sound and to begin addressing some historical performance goals...
 

Read the full interview on the Boulder Bach Beat Blog

 

Boulder Bach Beat Blog: Finding the Perfect Balance

by Edward McCue

In 1756, Leopold Mozart observed that “there are performers who tremble consistently on each note as if they had the permanent fever” and suggested that vibrato should be used only on sustained notes and perhaps as an ornament at the ends of phrases. He recommended that ”the performer pay attention to the Affekt [i.e., emotion] intended by the composer, so that the most appropriate bowing could be chosen” and that musicians pursue an education broad enough to encompass the study of literature and especially poetry, “for a cantabile style should be the aim of every instrumentalist, and poetry is the key to good musical phrasing.”

Read the full article on the Boulder Bach Beat blog

 

Boulder Bach Festival launches a new blog: Boulder Bach Beat!

Boulder Bach Festival has launched a new blog called Boulder Bach Beat about "all things Bach"!  Written by BBF board member Edward McCue, the blog will keep you up-to-date on interesting events and information related to Bach's music, genius and legacy. Please enjoy, participate and let us know what you think!

www.boulderbachbeat.org

 

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In Memory - Carolyn Topping

The Boulder Bach Festival notes with sadness the passing of Carolyn Topping, wife of board member Jim Topping, who recently lost a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. Carolyn was a faithful supporter of the Festival and accompanied Jim to rehearsals as long as she could to sing along with the music she loved. Donations in Carolyn's memory may be made to the Boulder Bach Festival by check or online. The donations will be used to purchase scores for the choral library.

Colorado Gives Day - Tuesday, Dec. 6

Thanks to all who made a donation to the Boulder Bach Festival on Colorado Gives Day! We are sincerely grateful for your support. Special thanks to Community First Foundation and Giving First manager Dana Rinderknecht and her team for making this opportunity available for the multitude of worthy Colorado nonprofits. Generous Coloradans donated $12 million through 52,000 donations - a 150-percent increase over last year.

In Memory - Janice Effenberger

In Memory - Janice Effenberger, a long-time member of the Boulder Bach Festival chorus and its predecessor, the St. Cecilia Singers, passed away on November 9, 2011. Donations, in memory of Jan, can be made to the Boulder Bach Festival and will be used to purchase choral scores for upcoming concerts.

BBF Has Direct Ties to New Choral Group: Seicento Baroque Ensemble Premieres in November

Boulder, CO – Starting with several choristers who are singing in both groups, continuing with Evanne Browne, who previously soloed with the Boulder Bach Festival (BBF) and has filled in as rehearsal choral conductor, and founded on a shared commitment to historically-informed performance techniques, the BBF has numerous ties to the area’s newest choral group, Seicento Baroque Ensemble.

Rick Erickson, BBF music director welcomes this distinctive new ensemble. “I am delighted to see the development of this outstanding new group dedicated to the rich repertoire of the 17th and 18th centuries! Our common goals and musical loves will certainly contribute to a deepening love for historically informed musical experiences on the Front Range and beyond. I look forward to hearing Seicento Baroque Ensemble and to exciting collaborations ahead!”

The 25-voice auditioned chamber choir is focusing exclusively on choral music of the 17th and 18th centuries, highlighting composers such as Claudio Monteverdi, Marc-Antoine Charpentier, Giacomo Carissimi, Heinrich Schütz, Heinrich von Biber, and Henry Purcell. 

“How wonderful for us that years of excellent Boulder Bach performances created singers and audiences who immediately will connect with Seicento!” Browne stated. “In return, the repertoire that Seicento performs will only enhance an audience’s enjoyment of hearing the BBF. Seicento will feature music that would have been familiar to J.S. Bach, music by his predecessors and colleagues, music that influenced him to compose cantatas and other major works.”

Seicento Baroque Ensemble’s artistic director, Evanne Browne, has extensive performing and conducting experience both nationally and internationally. Prior to moving to Boulder in 2005, Ms. Browne sang with the Washington Bach Consort as well as numerous other groups. Here, she is known for bringing together a community of experienced musicians for major choral works.

Seicento’s premiere performance will be on Saturday, November 12, 2011 at 7:30 pm at First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce Street, Boulder.  Program highlights include Come Ye Sons of Art by Henry Purcell, the Coronation Anthem My Heart Is Inditing by George Frideric Handel, and works by Claudio Monteverdi and Sigismondo d’India.

A second concert series is scheduled for February 17-19, 2012, with performances booked in Denver, Boulder and Estes Park.

For more information visit www.seicentobaroque.org or contact Evanne Browne at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

In appreciation: Camera music critic will be missed - Daily Camera, 10/6/11, by Christopher Brauchli

"In appreciation: Camera music critic will be missed"
by Christopher Brauchli
Daily Camera, October 6, 2011

Classical music in Boulder has lost a friend. Not just any friend but its champion and supporter for more than 30 years—a friend unlike any that Boulder or most communities could ever hope for.

Wes Blomster, the longtime Camera classical music critic who died on Saturday, was the announcer of musical events to come, critic of musical events past and reporter of musical events in distant places. Under the noms de plume of Andeas Anderswo and Adrian Angst he wrote insightful program notes for the University of Colorado College of Music, the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra and other musical organizations in our town.

He enthusiastically supported the creation of and performances by the Colorado Music Festival and the Boulder Bach Festival. His efforts contributed to the conversion of the Boulder Philharmonic from an amateur orchestra to a fully professional orchestra. The Mahler Fest, Ars Nova singers and countless other musical organizations have been the beneficiaries of his support. Wes was Boulder’s musical muse. Without the contributions made by him over the past 30 years the Boulder musical scene would not be the vibrant place it has become.

Wes was quiet. He did not crave publicity. When a group of us were arranging a tribute to him at a CMF concert in 2010 he got wind of it and in response to my letter urging him to let the tribute take place after I learned of his disapproval, he responded, saying, among other things: “I really do not want this—Central City tried to spring a big surprise for my 80th a year ago; I found out about it and didn’t show—great embarrassment on all sides . . . I am flattered by your words, but really do not want this.”

Although Wes would not let us honor him for his contribution to the musical life of Boulder while he lived, he will be honored and remembered for many years to come for the invaluable contribution he made to the musical life of our town. There will be other music reviewers and others who promote the musical arts, but Boulder will never again see the likes of Wes Blomster. We will all miss him.

Christopher Brauchli, co-founder and first president of The Colorado Music Festival and Boulder Bach Festival and current member of the Board of the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra.

2011-12 BBF e-Brochure

Flip-through our brochure online:

 

Wes Blomster, 1929-2011: An Appreciation

Wes Blomster, 1929-2011: An Appreciation by Scott Cantrell
MusicalAmerica.com, October 5, 2011

DALLAS—Wes Blomster’s day job was as a professor of German, for 30 years at the University of Colorado at Boulder. But his passion clearly was music, and having begun a sideline as a music critic in the early 1980s he turned it into his “real” job after he retired from the university in 1992. He was also very active in the Music Critics Association of North America (MCANA), and his heroic work as the organization’s education chair prompted his election as an honorary life member.

Those who knew his intense dedication will not be surprised to learn that he attended a Boulder Bach Festival concert barely a week before he died of cancer that had spread to his lungs. Four days after the concert, he was admitted to hospice care. The day before his death, he sent out a typically terse, no-nonsense e-mail to be distributed to friends: “For the moment,” it concluded, “I am in no pain. Beyond that there is not much to say.” He died Saturday, Oct. 1, at age 82. He is survived by a son, Thomas Blomster, a Denver-based conductor.

Wes was for nearly 30 years a classical-music critic for the Boulder Daily Camera, and in later years he wrote for more and more print and online publications, including MusicalAmerica.com. Once freed of his university duties, he traveled to cover performances around the world, in the last year including China and Israel.

The most modest figure in a field not exactly known for small egos, Wes would have been the last to describe himself as a great critic. He clearly saw his job mainly as describing the experience of musical performances, and by implication signaling their importance. But he brought a long life’s experience of performances to his reviews and feature stories, and he was a clear, engaging writer.

A native of Aberdeen, South Dakota, he received a BA, magna cum laude, from the University of Iowa and MA and PhD degrees in German from the University of Colorado. His master’s thesis was on the influence of Wagner on the writings of Thomas Mann, his doctoral dissertation on Mann’s commentary on his own works. He also did graduate study at the Free University of Berlin and the University of Vienna. He held several teaching positions in the U.S. and Canada before joining the Colorado faculty, and during 1979-80 he was a visiting professor at the University of Tübingen, Germany. In addition to German language and literature—and early on, Russian—he taught courses in the operas of Mozart and Strauss.

I met Wes in 1986 at a MCANA educational institute he organized at the University of Colorado, in conjunction with the Colorado Music Festival. The festival’s focus that year was French music, and among the activities Wes gave a talk on the notorious Dreyfus affair. Afterward, he rather apologetically said the subject had been far out of his range of expertise, but the talk was a model of thorough research and thoughtful organization, complete with extensive visuals. I thought: This is one smart man, but such an unassuming one.

When I was elected president of MCANA in 1993, an immediate challenge was finding a chair for the education committee, in many ways a bigger job than the presidency. Having retired from the university, Wes offered to help with any MCANA work that needed doing, and I hesitatingly brought up the education job. “Actually,” he said, “I was thinking about that.”

He turned it into practically a full-time job, and, with help from William Littler in Toronto and others, arranged more educational institutes than I could keep up with. We were on the phone at least once a week, and e-mails flew back and forth. He was easily the best thing about my four years in the job.

I gather a lot of people found Wes hard to get to know, and he did tend to be a very private person. I feel so privileged that he became a friend of whom I was enormously fond; we got to know each other well enough to exchange all sorts of juicy gossip as well as essential business, with many laughs along the way. Wes had a remarkably clear-eyed view of life and people’s foibles, and a real sense of humor, and he had a deliciously mischievous—but never malevolent—streak.

I’m sorry we saw each other mainly in passing in recent years, at opera performances here and there. But there was always a big hug, and usually at least some tidbit of gossip. Wes was smart as could be, intensely dedicated and a hard worker. He was also sensitive and generous, a total sweetheart. Those whose paths he crossed were blessed.

At Wes’ request, memorial contributions may be made to his son Thomas Blomster’s Colorado Chamber Orchestra, 1820 Race St., Denver, CO 80206-1116.

Boulder’s Smiling Bach (Opus Colorado, 9/24/11)

Opening Concert review "...The members of the Boulder Bach Festival ensemble are all vastly superior musicians and they demonstrated that Friday night."

Boulder’s Smiling Bach
by Robin McNeil
OpusColorado.com
September 24, 2011

It is really remarkable, sometimes, how a change in leadership can so strongly affect musical organizations. In this case, I am referring to the musicians of the Boulder Bach Festival whom I heard Friday night at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church on Glenarm Place in downtown Denver. First of all, let me say that St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church is an absolutely perfect venue for the Boulder Bach Festival. It is big enough for a good sized audience, and yet it is not so big that the music gets lost, and it is not so big that one loses the feeling of intimacy that adds to the enjoyment and warmth of the performance.

The change in musicians that I mentioned above has to do with the way they performed. I have often mentioned in my reviews that it is wonderful to see musicians enjoying the music that they are performing. To many of you, that may seem like an unnecessarily obvious statement, but I really don’t think it is. There are some chamber groups whose members sit stone-faced, perhaps because they are on the cutting edge of their technical ability, or they may be trying to cover for a member of the group who can’t quite cut the mustard. But the members of the Boulder Bach Festival ensemble are all vastly superior musicians and they demonstrated that Friday night. Add to that the joy of being given a certain amount of “free reign,”  where they are allowed to show their tremendous gifts as musicians, as well as their love for the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. There is no doubt in my mind that Maestro Rick Erickson is a perfect fit for these musicians, and that he has the experience and the love of Bach shared by everyone in the organization. Without going too far in making a comparison, I would imagine that it is quite similar to being conducted by Fritz Reiner or Gustavo Dudamel. Both are (were) astounding musicians, but one allows the musicians to have some joy and never insults their intelligence.

What an astounding difference he has made!

The BBF opened their program with Brandenburg Concerto Nr.3 in G major. As everyone knows, Bach dedicated the six orchestral Brandenburg Concertos to Margrave Christian Ludwig of Brandenburg. It was long thought that these concertos were the result of a commission; however, Bach never collected one single dime for them (it seems that even Bach suffered frustrations), and that has led many scholars to think that these six concertos were a form of job application. They were written in 1721, and there is no question that Bach absorbed the Italian concerto grosso style from Albinoni, Vivaldi, and probably, Corelli as well. It is my guess that everyone who reads this article is familiar with the Brandenburg Concerti, so I will not go into great detail, except to say that Nr. 3 was scored for three violins, three violas, three cellos, bass, and continuo. With this instrumentation, Bach creates such a wide range of instrumental colors that it boggles the mind.

From the outset, the musicians displayed a vivacity and liveliness which has been missing from their performances for the last year or so. It is not that past performances were all bad, but they were certainly lacking the rhythmic pulse and spirit that is so prevalent in Bach’s music. What was most noticeable was the impression they left of almost forgetting the audience, and just wallowing in their own joy of playing the music. There was eye contact from everyone to each other, always with a smile. Their energy was noticeable, as was their trust in each other. Entrances were precise, as was their overall skill. Phrasing from everyone was impeccable. And truly, why not? These are consummate musicians, and after hearing the performance Friday night, one wonders at the good fortune we all share in having them in Boulder. Zachary Carrettin, Mintze Wu, and Stacey Brady were the violinists. Erika Eckert, Matthew Dane, and Summer Rhodes performed on the violas. The cellists were Ann Marie Morgan, Katharine Knight, and Karen Terbeek, with Paul Erhard on bass, and Maestro Erickson, harpsichord.

Following the Brandenburg Nr. 3, Rick Erickson performed “O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig,” from the Great Eighteen Chorales. When Bach was in Weimar, one of his responsibilities as organist was the harmonization of Lutheran chorale melodies for the benefit of the choir. As a matter of fact, many music schools still use these chorale harmonizations for the instruction of music theory. During the period of 1715 to 1722 or three, Bach wrote eighteen chorale preludes which, for what ever reason, were not assembled as a group of pieces until approximately 1740. The work that Maestro Erickson performed is from this set of chorales.

The organ at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church is not large. And while that may cause consternation among some organ aficionados, to my ears as a pianist, it seemed not only entirely adequate, but it lent itself quite well to the wonderfully intimate setting of this church. Let us not forget – and please refer to my article of January 12, 2011 on the BBF’s appointment of Richard Erickson – what his qualifications are, because he has a current position at the Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in New York City which is not too distant from the positions that Bach held. Simply put, he is a superb organist. This was the first time I had heard a performance of this particular Chorale Prelude, and upon first hearing, some of the ornaments seemed quite difficult, probably because the “feel” of an organ keyboard is so very different from the piano keyboard (to me, an organ keyboard has always seemed much slower to react). But Erikson’s playing was absolutely marvelous musically and technically.

Next on the concert, the Boulder Bach Festival ensemble performed the final Brandenburg in the series of six. Erika Eckert and Matthew Dane violas; Ann Marie Morgan, Katherine Knight, and Karen Terbeek, cellos; Paul Erhard, bass, and Rick Erickson on harpsichord were the performers. What sets this particular Brandenburg Concerto apart from the others, is something that even trained musicians and musicologists might miss, but when it is mentioned, they have an “Oh, yeah!” moment. That is the fact that at the time Bach was active, the low strings were generally used for supporting roles. Not so in this final Brandenburg. They have some very difficult solo music to play. The result of Bach’s instrumentation in this particular work gives it an unmistakable sense of repose. The second movement, which is absolutely gorgeous, ends in a key other than the opening key, and the third movement, which is very quick, is a theme and variations, but the opening creates the impression that it is going to be a gigue. Bach’s inventiveness and originality know no bounds. My question is simply this: how do you pick a favorite Brandenburg Concerto?  This piece was absolutely beautifully done.

After the intermission, Zachary Carrettin, the concertmaster performed the Chaconne in D minor from the Second Violin Partita. This ranks as one of the most difficult pieces written for violin. Why? Because the violin has so many double and triple stops, and chords which are arpeggiated. Brahms thought so highly of this Chaconne that he transcribed it for left hand alone at the piano, justifying it because the violinist has to finger the violin with all of its difficulties with just the left-hand. Therefore, the pianist should have to go through the same agony of difficulty. I have performed the Brahms’ transcription many times, and it is difficult. But every time I hear a violinist perform this work, there is no question that it is more difficult, because the violinist has to go clear across the strings so many times. Zachary Carrettin is a wonderful violinist, and quite frankly, he made the piece seem easy. I assure you that it is not. His tone was incredible and his sense of phrasing and voicing would surely have pleased Bach. This work contains so many hidden passageways that produce over 60 (yes, 60) variants of the original theme. The result can be the most beautiful sense of exhaustion, certainly for the performer, and probably the intent listener. It was a fantastic performance.

The last work on this concert was Brandenburg Nr. 5. This Concerto was written while Bach was in Cöthen, and is in his typical ritornello form. That is to say that each movement is based on a theme that is restated in the various instruments in many ways. The final movement, which sets this Concerto apart from the others, is a fugue comprised of gigue rhythms (compound meter) and a center section which is a cantabile version of the fugue subject. Constantly, ever constantly, Bach is so ingenious. The BBF ensemble again seemed so overjoyed at performing this work, Christina Jennnings on flute was fabulous, and the sincerity with which they played was absolutely unmistakable. The performance of this last Concerto was so consistently excellent, as was the whole program, that the audience demanded an encore. And much to my delight, they performed the last movement of Brandenburg Nr. 5 again, and only for the encore, they performed just a few ticks faster. That tempo seemed just as perfect, and it certainly demonstrated that every musician in the organization was technically gifted. Following Bach’s circuitous routes is never easy, but always delightful.

I am sure many of you readers are familiar with the portrait of Bach holding a slip of paper in his hand. He looks rather stern and incredibly serious. Written on the slip of paper is a canon: proof that he could write one, the proof which was requested by a potential employer. While holding the paper, his face seems to say, “Yes, I can write a canon. It is easy for me. Now hire me.” I am sure he was serious, but I kept thinking all throughout Friday evening’s concert, that he must have spent so much of his life smiling. The performers certainly smiled, and I can guarantee you that his music, and the wonderful performance which was given by the Boulder Bach Festival ensemble, made me smile.

The Exciting New Boulder Bach Festival (Opus Colorado, 8/24/11)

"It is the time of year when I receive many new press releases concerning organizations and their opening concerts. I must say that one of the most exciting is going to be the Boulder Bach Festival opening concert; in fact, their whole season will be quite exciting because they have a new director, Rick Erickson..."

The Exciting New Boulder Bach Festival
OpusColorado.com by Robin McNeil
August 24, 2011

It is the time of year when I receive many new press releases concerning organizations and their opening concerts. I must say that one of the most exciting is going to be the Boulder Bach Festival opening concert; in fact, their whole season will be quite exciting because they have a new director, Rick Erickson, whom I wrote about in an article last January.

In that blog article, I said: “Erickson earned a master’s degree in organ performance and literature and received a performer’s certificate from the Eastman School of Music. He studied organ with David Craighead, Lucile Hammill Webb, and Russell Saunders, improvisation with Gerre Hancock, and conducting with Robert DeCormier and David Effron. Erickson holds a bachelor’s degree in music and German from the University of Wisconsin, Superior, where he has been honored as “Distinguished Alumnus” and cited as “one of the 100 distinguished graduates” in the school’s 100th anniversary year. A native of Superior, Wisconsin, Erickson began organ study at the age of fourteen.

“Rick Erickson brings passion and excitement that will carry the Boulder Bach Festival forward,” said Robert (Bob) Spillman, emeritus music director, Boulder Bach Festival, “and he has the artistry and the skills to provide the most exhilarating performances of Bach’s music for our community.

“Erickson also directs the renowned Bach Vespers series at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, where he presents more than 20 cantatas and other major Bach works each season with the all-professional Bach Choir and Bach Players on period instruments. During the past ten seasons, Erickson has more than doubled the number of performances for the Bach Vespers series. He has performed Bach’s complete organ repertoire twice and is in the midst of the third cycle.”

All of this is good news, of course, and (another of course) one would expect the Boulder Bach Festival to hire the best in the business. But, to my way of thinking, one of the most exciting aspects of this is that Rick Erickson truly believes that one of his responsibilities, and I received this information directly from Ms. Marcia Schirmer, who is the Executive Director of the BBF, is the education of the audience, and particularly, the young people in the audience. As most of you know, I have written about the direction music has been taking in the last twenty or thirty years, and I think that it is terrific that a musician in his position wishes to expand the Bach for Kids and the Kids for Bach concerts, and will take the time to do it. All of you granting organizations and foundations out there who read this, take note: this is outreach at its best. In addition, in February, on the 27th and 28th, there will be open rehearsals at the First Congregational Church in Boulder.

The Boulder Bach Festival will present its opening concert twice, and the first will be September 23, Friday, at St. Andrews Episcopal Church, which is in Denver at 2015 Glenarm Place. It will begin at 7:30 PM. Their second performance will be in Boulder on September 25, Sunday, at St. John’s Episcopal Church, at 1419 Pine Street. That concert will begin at 4 PM in the afternoon.

The opening concert will be comprised of three Brandenburg Concertos, Numbers 3, 5, and 6. Also on the program is the Chaconne in D minor from the Partita Nr. 2 for Violin, and one of Bach’s Chorale Preludes entitled O Lamm Gottes, Unschuldig, from the Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes, for solo organ.

This is really quite something to look forward to. So no one in the Denver Metro area has an excuse for not attending one of these concerts. One is in Boulder, the other is in Denver. What could be easier than that?

Bach Fest projects new image (Daily Camera, 8/21/11)

Daily Camera article |

Boulder Bach Festival’s 2011-2012 Season Celebrates “Brandenburg and More”

BBF’s 31st season features seven traditional concerts, open rehearsals, and “Bach in the Community”

The Boulder Bach Festival welcomes Rick Erickson as the new music director and celebrates a season of Brandenburg and More, with seven traditional concerts, “Bach in the Community” events, and rehearsals that are free and open to the public. The 2011-2012 season, BBF’s 31st, runs from September 23, 2011, to March 4, 2012.

The BBF season opens with a chamber concert on September 23 and 25, 2011, in Denver and Boulder, respectively, and features Brandenburg Concertos No. 3, 5, and 6, performed by the Boulder Bach Festival Players, a newly formed ensemble with members that include Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello; Erika Eckert and Matthew Dane, viola; Christina Jennings, flute; and Rick Erickson, harpsichord and organ.

The first of the “Bach in the Community” events takes place on November 12, 2011, featuring a free concert at the WOW Children’s Museum in Lafayette, Colorado. On February 12, 2012, Kids for Bach, the second event in this public series takes place at the Boulder Public Library featuring K through 12 auditioned winners performing solo and chamber works of J.S. Bach.

The Festival Organ Recital, February 24 & 25, 2012, in Denver and Boulder, respectively, features Michael Unger, the 2008 First Prize Winner of the American Guild of Organists National Young Artists Competition. Unger, a Gold Medal graduate of the University of Western Ontario, received his masters’ degrees in organ and harpsichord from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. He performs extensively, and is also a church musician, chamber musician, and published composer.

The Boulder Bach Festival week kicks off on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, with the third “Bach in the Community” event featuring a colloquium that probes the deeper complexities of Bach and performances by festival artists. This afternoon event, which is free and open to the public, provides a wonderful introduction to the subsequent performances during the festival week.

The festival week continues on Wednesday, February 29, 2012, with a chamber concert featuring Brandenburg Concertos No. 2 and No. 4, Bach choral selections, and Bach solo organ works performed by Rick Erickson.

On Thursday, March 1, 2012, the final “Bach in the Community” event takes place with Bach for Kids, an interactive and multidimensional event featuring Boulder Bach Festival artists and kids at the Boulder Public Library.

The Boulder Bach Festival final concert takes place on March 3, 2012, at the Mountain View United Methodist Church, in Boulder, with the Boulder Bach Festival Players and the Boulder Bach Festival Chorus, featuring Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, Cantatas BWV 147 and 187, and Motet BWV 230. Vocal soloists include Amanda Balestrieri, soprano; Eric Brenner, countertenor; Daniel Hutchings, tenor; and Joe Damon Chappel, bass.

Bach Vespers, after the New York practice based on the Leipzig tradition, is a post-festival special event that takes place on March 4, 2012, at Grace Lutheran Church, in Boulder, with featured festival artists and vocal soloists performing Cantata BWV 159, Sehet, wir gehn hinauf gen Jerusalem. The audience is invited to sing the chorale movement.

Dates for 2011/2012 Boulder Bach Festival Concerts and Events (31st Season)

Season Opening Chamber Concerts
September 23, Friday, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 2015 Glenarm Place, Denver, 7:30 p.m.
September 25, Sunday, St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1419 Pine Street, Boulder, 4 p.m.
Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, BWV 1048
BWV 656, O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig, from the Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes, solo organ
Brandenburg Concerto No. 6, BWV 1051
Chaconne in D Minor from Partita No. 2 for Violin, BWV 1004
Brandenburg Concerto No. 5, BWV 1050

Boulder Bach Festival Artists: Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello; Erika Eckert and Matthew Dane, viola; Christina Jennings, flute; and Rick Erickson, harpsichord and organ
Boulder Bach Festival Players

Open rehearsals, St. John’s Episcopal Church, Boulder
September 20, 2012, Tuesday, TBA
September 21, 2012, Wednesday, TBA
September 22, 2012, Thursday, 7 to 10 p.m. (dress rehearsal)

Bach in the Community, Bach for Kids Concert
November 12, 2011, Saturday, 11 a.m.
WOW Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave, Lafayette, Colorado, (free).
Boulder Bach Festival Trio

Bach in the Community, Kids for Bach Concert
February 12, 2012, Sunday, 2 p.m.
Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. (at 9th St. and Canyon),
K through 12 auditioned winners performing solo and chamber works of J.S. Bach, (free).

Festival Organ Recital
February 24, 2012, Friday, St. John’s Cathedral, 1350 Washington Street, Denver, 7:30 p.m.
February 25, 2012, Saturday, First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street, Boulder, 7:30 p.m.
Michael Unger, 2008 Winner, Guild of Organists’ National Young Artists Competition.

Festival Week

Bach in the Community, Festival Artist Performances and Colloquium
February 28, 2012, Tuesday, 2 to 4 p.m., location TBA, (free).

Chamber Concert
February 29, 2012, Wednesday
First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street, Boulder, 7:30 p.m.
Brandenburg Concerto No. 2, BWV 1047
Cantata BWV 167, Ihr Menschen, rϋhmet Gottes Liebe, chorale
BWV 654, Schmϋcke dich, O liebe Seele, solo organ
Mein treuer Heiland, lass dich fragen, bass aria and chorale, from St. John Passion

Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, BWV 1049
Boulder Bach Festival Artists: Joe Damon Chappel, bass; Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello; Rick Erickson, harpsichord and organ; Christina Jennings, flute; Bruce Barrie, trumpet
Boulder Bach Festival Players and Boulder Bach Festival Chamber Choir

Open rehearsals, First Congregational Church, Boulder
February 27, 2012, Monday, 1 to 4 p.m.
February 28, 2012, Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
February 28, 2012, Tuesday, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. (dress rehearsal)

Bach in the Community, Bach for Kids, Interactive Sessions with Festival Artists
March 1, 2012, Thursday
Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. (9th & Canyon), 2:30 to 5 p.m.
A multidimensional, interactive day with BBF artists and kids, (free).

Final Concert
March 3, 2012, Saturday
Mountain View United Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Street, Boulder, 7:30 p.m.
Cantata BWV 187, Es wartet alles auf dich
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, BWV 1046
Motet BWV 230, Lobet den Herrn alle Heiden
Cantata BWV 147, Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben

Amanda Balestrieri, soprano; Eric Brenner, countertenor; Daniel Hutchings, tenor; and Joe Damon Chappel, bass; Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello
Boulder Bach Festival Players and Boulder Bach Festival Chorus

Open rehearsals, Mountain View United Methodist Church, Boulder
March 1, 2012, Thursday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 1, 2012, Thursday, 6 to 9:30 p.m.
March 2, 2012, Friday, 7 to 10 p.m., (dress rehearsal)

Bach Vespers, after the New York practice based on the Leipzig tradition
March 4, 2012, Sunday
Grace Lutheran Church, 1001 13th Street, Boulder, 4:15 p.m.
Rick Erickson, conductor
BBF artists: Amanda Balestrieri, soprano; Eric Brenner, countertenor; Daniel Hutchings, tenor; and Joe Damon Chappel, bass; Zachary Carrettin, concertmaster; Ann Marie Morgan, cello
Boulder Bach Festival Players
Cantata BWV 159, Sehet, wir gehn hinauf gen Jerusalem
The audience is invited to sing the chorale movement. Audience rehearsal at 3:45 p.m.

About the Boulder Bach Festival
The Boulder Bach Festival was founded in 1981 to present the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and to encourage knowledge and appreciation of the Baroque master. Since 1982 a multi-day festival has been presented each year, featuring an orchestra, chorus, and soloists drawn from a pool of area musicians as well as nationally-known artists from around the country. Over the years it has gradually added concerts outside of its original format so that presentations now extend through most of the year. For programming, tickets, and further information, visit the website at http://www.boulderbachfestival.org or call 303-776-9666.

Boulder Bach Festival Welcomes Music Director Rick Erickson

“Bach, with good reason, is addictive,” says Rick Erickson, the new music director of the Boulder Bach Festival. “He invites the best of us, as listeners and performers—he seldom lets us off the hook with his rich, complex compositions and his beautiful, simple melodies.” This is the energy and passion that Erickson, who directs the renowned Bach Vespers series at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in New York City, is bringing to the BBF. “I look forward to moving BBF into an exciting and creative future,” he says.

Boulder Bach Festival Welcomes Music Director Rick Erickson
Noted cantor, organist, and conductor to bring Bach into coffee houses, wine bars, and community venues

“Bach, with good reason, is addictive,” says Rick Erickson, the new music director of the Boulder Bach Festival. “He invites the best of us, as listeners and performers—he seldom lets us off the hook with his rich, complex compositions and his beautiful, simple melodies.”

This is the energy and passion that Erickson, who directs the renowned Bach Vespers series at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in New York City, is bringing to the Boulder Bach Festival. “I look forward to moving BBF into an exciting and creative future,” he says. “That includes establishing an identifiable and stable instrumental ensemble, expanding the ability of the choral ensembles, and inviting solo artists from the Front Range and beyond—in part, to make a festival that not only invites our community, but also people from far away to join us.”

This year’s Boulder Bach Festival celebrates a season called Brandenburg and More, with seven traditional concerts, “Bach in the Community” events, and rehearsals that are free and open to the public. “We plan to engage the entire community, especially by bringing Bach into coffee houses, wine bars, art galleries, and more,” says Erickson. “The concert events follow the pattern of the past, and we are exploring the cantata literature more in depth than in prior seasons. In addition, we’re adding Bach Vespers, on the final day of the festival, which is what I spend my life in NYC doing.”

At Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Erickson presents more than 20 cantatas and other major works by Bach throughout the year. During the past ten seasons, he has more than doubled the number of performances for the Bach Vespers series. He has performed Bach’s complete organ repertoire twice and is in the midst of the third cycle.

“For me, the Boulder Bach Festival is a fresh experience and a welcomed new direction in my own life,” he says. “It’s renewing and delightful, and it invites my strengths and encourages me to think differently about everything.”

Erickson earned a master’s degree in organ performance and literature from the Eastman School of Music. A native of Superior, Wisconsin, he began to study the organ at the age of fourteen.

The Boulder Bach Festival 2011-2012 season runs from September 23, 2011, to March 4, 2012. For information, visit http://www.boulderbachfestival.org

Boulder Bach Festival Brochure is in the Mail!

The brochure for the 2011 season of the Boulder Bach Festival is in the mail. Look for it in your mailbox.DOWNLOAD IT HERE AND FORWARD IT TO A FRIEND!

Bob Spillman to Give Lectures on the B-Minor Mass

Coming to a Neighborhood Near You!

Boulder Bach Festival

Lecture Series:  BACH MASS IN B-MINOR
Who: Robert Spillman, emeritus music director

February 15, 2011, Tuesday, 7:30 PM – The Academy – 970 Aurora Ave, Boulder

February 20, 2011, Sunday, 9AM – First United Methodist Church, 1521 Spruce Street, Boulder

February 22, 2011, Tuesday, 12:15 to 1:15 PM – Academy for Lifelong Learning Willshire Presbyterian Church, 2999 South Colorado Blvd (south of Yale, north of Hampden), Denver

February 27, 2011, Sunday, 9AM – First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine Street, Boulder

March 2, 2011, Wednesday, 7:30 PM – Frasier Meadows Retirement Community – 350 Ponca Place, Assembly Meeting Room, Fourth Floor, Boulder

March 6, 2011, Sunday, 10:15 AM – Atonement Lutheran Church, 685 Inca Parkway, Boulder

Bach Unaccompanied Sonatas and Partitas at College of Music

On February 2 at 7:30 p.m. violinist James Stern, a multi-faceted musician whose violin playing has been heard worldwide, will present a recital of J. S. Bach's ordered set of six works for unaccompanied violin (the sonatas and partitas). Stern visits CU-Boulder from the University of Maryland School of Music for this rare complete performance of the Sei Solo.

See the full concert description under Bach Around the Clock.

Fall Chamber Concert is Sunday, Oct. 24!

Don't miss our October concert featuring violinist Lina Bahn and flutist Christina Jennings!

The 30th anniversary season opens with a fall chamber concert featuring Lina Bahn, violin; and Christina Jennings, flute in Bach’s Concerto in C minor, originally scored for violin and oboe.  Click here for full details and a preview of the Fall 2010 Chamber Concert

Festival Announces Search for New Music Director.

The Boulder Bach Festival Board of Directors announces a search for a new Music Director. The Music Director's musical and artistic direction will lead the Festival into its fourth decade of celebrating the legacy of Johann Sebastian Bach. The Board invites qualified applicants to send materials according to the directions in the accompanying Position Description.

Music Director

Description:

The music director position is a contracted, part-time position with the primary responsibility for overall artistic leadership of the Boulder Bach Festival. This leadership falls into several broad categories that include planning, event preparation, rehearsal management, conducting musical ensembles in concert, and community relations. The music director reports to the board of directors and works in concert with the committees, and other staff to carry out the mission and vision of BBF according to the current strategic plan. The position begins with the 2011 – 2012 season.

Qualifications:

• MMA, or comparable degree—required; DMA—preferred;
• Extensive knowledge of the music of J. S. Bach and related composers, and expertise in Baroque performance;
• Choral and instrumental conducting experience;
• Residential requirement in the Boulder-Denver metro area OR demonstrated plan to be available for outreach events, important administrative meetings, fundraising, and PR activities, Festival performances, and chorus preparation fall through spring;
• Knowledge of potential guest artists and soloists and experience in selecting them on artistic merits.

Highly desired skills and attributes:

• Experience in leading a community-based, non-profit organization with substantial outreach to the community;
• Experience working with a board of directors;
• Experience in creating and managing operating budgets for non-profit organizations;
• Experience in creating personnel policies and making personnel decisions for chorus and orchestra;
• Good communication skills with internal constituencies as well as the community;
• Experience and skill with public speaking;
• Ability to inspire our performers and our audience;
• Dedication to excellence.

To apply:

Submit a letter of introduction, a resume, and three references via e-mail to: musicdirectorapps@boulderbachfestival.org. Review of applications will begin Sept. 17, 2010.
Hard copy submissions will be accepted and should be mailed to: P.O. Box 1896, Boulder, CO 80306.
Phone inquiries: 303 494 6669.

Position Announcement